Coming to the Alentejo (or indeed the Extremadura) region in late spring, you’ll be greeted by a sea of yellow flowers. The plants responsible for this spectacular view are yellow lupins, or Lupinus luteus. Lupins are great nitrogen fixers and improve soil texture and drainage because of their deep roots. And while they play an important role in creating fertile soil, they are also prized for their seeds, the quintessential Portuguese snack: tremoços. Made popular by the Romans, the lupin beans have to be soaked in brine for a few days before they become edible. Once prepared, the “tremoços” are a high protein and fibre snack, with lots of antioxidant power packed in wile being relatively low in fat. You can ask for them at virtually any bar in Portugal, and they are great together with a cold beer on a warm spring evening.


4 Comments

Balázs Czéh · 13 June 2018 at 7:21 pm

Hi Stephan,
i am wondering if all the lupins have the same potential, or just some varieties. I learned about blue lupin which is not bitter and can be used by vegans instead of soy, or even for feeding animals and thought i will order some seeds next year, but i have many plants with different colours for ornamental role in my garden and around the cottage simply because the insects and i love them. Should i try if i find a recipe for the brine or can you help me out w this?
Best wishes, Balázs

    Stephan · 14 June 2018 at 6:47 pm

    Hey Balázs! I think they are different varieties (and I suspect some are actually quite poisenous!). This recipe https://woodlandfoods.com/recipes/brined-lupini-beans isn’t quite like the original, but it certainly sounds very tasty! I’ll definitely try it out 🙂
    Stephan

      Balázs Czéh · 14 June 2018 at 8:11 pm

      Thanks a lot! Next year i will plant some! 🙂

        Stephan · 14 June 2018 at 8:17 pm

        And thanks for the tip with using them instead of soy… just reading some great recipies on the net. Definitely more than just a humble snack!

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